• Hemp Earth Dispensary is looking for a “professional spliff roller”
  • The successful candidate will be paid £10 per hour to roll spliffs with CBD cannabis
  • However, CBD flowers, just like cannabis, are illegal in the UK
  • Cannabis, the flower, is illegal, regardless of its cannabinoid content

The Hemp Earth Dispensary, in Brighton, is looking for a “professional spliff roller,” despite cannabis (including “CBD flowers”) remaining illegal in the UK.

Advertising the position on Facebook, the post reads:

“We are seeking the crème de la crème of Brighton based spliff rollers to come and join our team at Hemp Earth Dispensary.

“Can you roll the perfect pure spliff in under five minutes? If so then we want you!

Facebook advert for cannabis in the UK

Advertising for a “professional spliff roller,” but would it be a legal job?

“Come to Hemp Earth Dispensary on Wednesday, February 27 at 2pm for a spliff rolling contest.

“You roll, we’ll time you. If you’re the fastest and make the prettiest spliff, then we’ll keep you.”

The successful candidate will  be paid £10 per hour, for 2 hours a week, to roll cannabis cigarettes from organic rolling paper and 0.7g of the ‘finest CDB Flowers’.

Tryouts for the position are being held tomorrow, Wednesday 27 February, but unfortunately for hopefuls, the event has “reached maximum capacity.”

cannabis UK facebook page

“Maximum capacity”: The potential to be paid to roll spliffs has proved incredibly popular

However, there is a serious concern about the legality of both the job position being offered and the products being sold at the Brighton CBD shop.

It is a common misconception in the UK that CBD flowers are legal.

Many believe that if a product contains less than 0.2% THC, it will fall into the legal definition of ‘hemp.’

The 0.2% THC level only applies to industrial hemp whilst it is being grown, not being sold as a finished product.

Currently, CBD is only legal in the UK when it has been processed into a finished product and approved by the MRHA.

Asked about the legality of “CBD flowers” in the UK, Jill Frankham, Senior Compliance Officer for the Drugs & Firearms Licensing Unit said:

Thank you for your email.

“I can confirm that the leaves and flowers of the genus Cannabis are controlled and defined as cannabis as outlined in Section 37(1) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.

Legal CBD flowers sold at British Brighton CBD cafe

Some of the “legal” CBD flowers being sold at the Hemp Earth Dispensary

“‘Cannabis’ (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—

(a) mature stalk of any such plant,
(b) fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and
(c) seed of any such plant;.”

“Once the separation of the stalk and seeds from the plant has occurred it will not be defined as cannabis. This also extends to the fibre produced from the stalk.”

I can confirm that the leaves and flowers of the genus Cannabis are controlled and defined as cannabis as outlined in Section 37(1) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.
– Jill Frankham, Senior Compliance Officer for the Drugs & Firearms Licensing Unit

Despite the law being clear on CBD flowers, a spokesman for the Hemp Earth Dispensary believes they are not breaking any laws

Speaking to The Metro, they said:

“We would like to make clear we are not offering a full time ‘job role’ here, and we are are hoping that those that do come along on the day, do so in a good-natured way, ready to have some fun, and engage with each other.

“The person we do select will be asked to produce some handmade rolls of legal herbal mixture for any of our customers that might request this – this will be for a maximum of eight hours per calendar month.

“More than anything we wish to stress, that nothing illegal is ever present on the premises at any time, and attempting to bring any prohibited substances on to our premises is strictly forbidden.”

With a crack-down on CBD looming over the UK, could stunts like this jeopardise the future of the UK’s booming CBD?

More availability of cannabis for patients is obviously a great step forward for the UK, but should these steps must be taken with more care to ensure longevity?

References and further Reading